Holidays Are Bad For Strained Relationship

Returning to work after the summer holidays often means stepping back into the routine of work and family life. For couples that are already under strain, this can be the tipping point to separation and divorce.

According to research by mediators in England and Wales couples often see an increase in phone calls and emails when the children are back in school.

While holidays are traditionally seen as good for relationships and families, the reality is they can be stressful and don’t always turn out as expected. This is particularly the case when relationships are already strained between couples and holidays only magnify their differences when the couple spends more time together.

Findings in the UK are also backed up in the US where research has found that there are clearly defined peaks in couples taking out divorce proceedings immediately after holiday seasons have ended particularly following Christmas and summer vacation periods.

So far from being the chance to take a breather and take stock, the evidence seems to support the view that in strained relationships it may be better not to take holidays together or at least make plans to ensure that holidays are as stress free as possible.

Contact us if you need guidance on matters relating to divorce and separation.

Categories: Family Law, Lund Bennett, Strained Relationships

Can Social Media Cause Divorce?

The Internet has been blamed for many of the dramatic changes that have taken place in society in recent decades, social media in particular. But can the influence of social media really be a reason for couples to divorce?

Some divorce lawyers certainly think so and they see it as the cause of a growing proportion of marital breakdowns.

One of the main reasons for this is the way people present their personal lives online. Facebook posts often show people at their best, enjoying great food, holidays in exotic locations and happy families.

It’s understandable that anyone reading these posts who has the misfortune of being in an unhappy marriage will feel some discontentment with their own lives.

‘Facebragging’, as it is sometimes called, is a well-established part of Facebook and it is natural for users to feel the pressure when they can’t compete with the kind of lives their friends and acquaintances are living.

While social media has its good points, it also encourages less interaction and communication in the real world which can bring its own disruption to family life. Social media can also expose bad behaviour particularly if images are posted or comments are made and shared with others in social circles.

While social media cannot be entirely to blame for marital breakups, it can certainly help tip strained relationships over the edge.

Categories: divorce, Divorce Law, Family Law, Lund Bennett, Marriage