Month: March 2019

When should a Prohibited Steps Order be used?

A Prohibited Steps Order can prevent one parent from making a significant change to a child’s life or upbringing that the other parent disagrees with.

When two or more people share parental responsibility of a child, it’s unlikely that their ideas about what’s best for the child will always align.

In most cases, it is possible to come to an amicable agreement, however in instances where an agreement can’t be reached, a Prohibited Steps Order may be applied for by the opposing person.

Applications for a Prohibited Steps Order can be made to the court, and if successful, they prevent a parent or guardian from performing an activity with the child.

What could warrant a Prohibited Steps Order?

When applying for a Prohibited Steps Order it’s important to remember that the child’s welfare will always be the key consideration in the court’s decision-making process.

Examples of the type of activity or decisions that may warrant a Prohibited Steps Order include if a parent or guardian wants to:

  • Move abroad with child.
  • Change the child’s school.
  • Change the child’s surname.
  • Allow child to have a medical treatment or operation.
  • Give the child a religious education.

When can a Prohibited Steps Order be used?

Prohibited Steps Orders are not restricted to parents, they can be made by anyone with parental responsibility, including guardians and those with a Residence Order in relation to the child.

However, you cannot apply for a Prohibited Steps Order when the child in question is in the care of a Local Authority or aged 16 or older.

For more help and advice with applying for a Prohibited Steps Order, please speak to one of our specialist solicitors here at Lund Bennett by giving us a call on 0161 927 3118.

What is included in a cohabitation agreement?

Cohabiting couples do not have the same legal protection as married couples, but a cohabitation agreement can offer some protection.

A cohabitation agreement allows couples living together to agree their financial commitments and obligations to each other, to avoid disputes later down the line.

With more people than ever now choosing to cohabit, the lack of legal protection for cohabiting couples can make breakups fraught and messy.

To avoid stressful disputes, many cohabiting couples are now choosing to create a legal cohabitation agreement, to iron out the details about what would happen in the event of a relationship breakdown.

A cohabitation agreement gives couples the opportunity to discuss who owns what, how property and assets should be split, and how children will be supported, should they decide to part ways in the future.

Creating an agreement in advance usually results in fair and realistic decisions being made, which isn’t always the case in the midst of a relationship breakdown.

are a few things that you should sit down and discuss in detail before creating a cohabitation agreement.

Whilst you’re cohabiting:

  • Who owns what?
  • How will bills and living expenses be covered?

In the event of a separation:

  • How will your possessions and assets be divided?
  • How will property be divided?
  • Where would children live?
  • How will children be financially supported?
  • How would money in joint accounts be split?
  • How would overdrafts and debt be split?
  • Who owns each vehicle?

For a cohabitation to be legally binding, you will each need to be able to confirm that you have received independent legal advice and entered into the agreement voluntarily.

For help and advice with a cohabitation dispute or creating an agreement, get in touch with our team of specialists here at Lund Bennett Law by giving us a call on 0161 927 3118.